For Scuba Diving and snorkeling tours of San Diego's best under water sites contact SeaClypse Dive Adventures at 619-203-3476
  scuba diving and Snorkeling San Diego-SeaClypse 619-203-3476
Scuba Diving and Snorkeling in San Diego-SeaClypse 619-203-3476
 

 

DAN COURSES

 

         
           
 

 

Diving Medicine

Divers Alert Network

  • 1-919 684-8111 (24 hours)
  • 1-919-684-4DAN (collect)
  • 1-800-446-2671 (toll-free)

 

Other Emergency Contacts

  • Lifeguards (24hrs)- 619 221-8800
  • La Jolla Shores- 619 221-8877
  • USCG (info):1 800-854-9834
  • USCG (SAR) : 619 295-3121
  • USCG NRC- 800-424-8802
  • Vessel Assist- 800 399-1921 or VHF 16

All Emergency Services can be reached by dialing 911 from any phone or hailing VHF 16

Recompression Facilities

  • UCSD Medical Center- 619 543-5222
  • UCSD (24hr consult)- 619 543-6737
  • Ballast Pt. (USNavy)- 619 553-1011
  • Catalina Is. (24hr)- 310 510-1053

 

 

   

DAN Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

DAN's Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries Provider Course was designed to fill the void in ofirst aid training available for the general diving public. This course represents entry level training designed to educate the general diving (and qualified non-diving) public in recognizing possible dive related injuries and providing emergency oxygen first aid while activating the local emergency medical services (EMS) and/or arranging for evacuation to the nearest available medical facility. In DANs most recent dive accident record, less than 33% of injured divers received emergency oxygen in the field. Few of those received oxygen concentrations approaching the recommended 100%. DAN and all major diving instructional agencies recommend that all divers be qualified to provide 100% oxygen in the field to those injured in a dive accident. More info >>

         
       
         
     

DAN Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

This module, Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries, is an advanced-level program that provides additional training for those individuals who have successfully completed the DAN Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries course within the past year (12 months). It is designed to train DAN Oxygen Providers to use the MTV-100 or a Bag Valve Mask (BVM) while providing care for a non-breathing injured diver and activating the local emergency medical services (EMS) and / or arranging for evacuation to the nearest available medical facility.

Rescue breathing with supplemental oxygen delivers upwards of 50 percent inspired oxygen when performed correctly. However, using an MTV-100 or Bag Valve Mask with oxygen can deliver nearly 100 percent inspired oxygen to a non-breathing injured diver. When supplemental oxygen is not available, a Bag Valve Mask can deliver 21 percent oxygen as compared to 16 percent with rescue breathing without supplemental oxygen. The MTV-100 does not work without an oxygen supply. More info >>

         
       
         
     

DAN First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries

A diver surfaces from a dive in an area abundant with coral, removes his fins and finds redness, swelling and blisters just beginning to show on his left ankle. He also experiences a stinging sensation on the same ankle.A diver, following a dive to an area filled with marine life, notices a small bite pattern on his lower right leg and some stiffness; he also experiences difficulty swallowing, has a generalized weakness and a slight numbness in the area of the bite.A diver experiences pain, nausea and some swelling associated with a purple-and-black puncture wound in his left knee.

The common thread from each of the three injuries is that they likely came from contact with some form of hazardous marine life. Given similar circumstances with you or a dive buddy, would you be able to appropriately treat each injury? Although serious hazardous marine life injuries are rare, most divers experience minor discomfort from unintentional encounters with fire coral, jellyfish and other marine creatures at some point in their dive careers. Knowing how to minimize these injuries helps you reduce diver discomfort and pain.The First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries program is designed to provide knowledge regarding specific types of marine creature injuries and the general first aid treatment for those injuries. More info >>

         
       
         
     

DAN AEDs for Scuba Diving Injuries

This course represents entry-level training designed to educate the general diving (and qualified non-diving) public to better recognize the warning signs of Sudden Cardiac Arrest and administer first aid using Basic Life Support techniques and Automated External Defibrillators while activating the local emergency medical services, (EMS) and / or arranging for evacuation to the nearest appropriate medical facility.

The mean age of divers who die each year in dive fatalities tracked by DAN is gradually increasing. It is now approximately 42 years of age. Divers are getting older, and older people are getting involved in diving.Of the 78 dive fatalities in the DAN 2001 Report on Decompression Illness, Diving Fatalities and Project Dive Exploration, based on 1999 fatalities, 7.7 percent of them were caused directly by heart disease. At the same time, heart disease was the direct cause of death for 26 percent of the fatalities involving divers over the age of 35.On top of that, 25 percent of divers involved in diving fatalities were also reported to be taking heart medications.

Heart disease is a common problem. To ignore that it affects divers as much as it affects the general population does divers a disservice. When you consider that diving is often done from remote locations - on beaches or off of dive boats - that are far removed from emergency medical help, it is important to prepare for every emergency. More info >>

         
       
         
     

DAN Oxygen First Aid for Aquatics

Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies, or Aquatic Oxygen Provider, represents training designed to educate the public to recognize possible aquatic related injuries and to provide emergency oxygen first aid while activating the local emergency medical services (EMS) and / or arranging for evacuation to the nearest medical facility. This course will train you to recognize near-drowning / submersion incidents and other aquatic medical emergencies and to provide basic life support including the use of oxygen first aid. Excellent course for lifeguards. More info >>

         
       
         
     

DAN Automated External Defibrillators for Aquatics

DAN Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for Aquatic Emergencies, represents entry-level training designed to educate the general public to better recognize the warning signs of Sudden Cardiac Arrest and administer first aid using Basic Life Support techniques and Automated External Defibrillators while activating the local emergency medical services (EMS) and / or arranging for evacuation to the nearest appropriate medical facility. When a person drowns, they may or may not inhale water. They normally enter cardiac arrest because of the inability to breathe. This course teaches you to provide care for cardiac arrest by using an automated external defibrillator (AED). More info >>

           
         
           
       

DAN Diving Emergency Management Provider Course

It is a rare event when a dive emergency is a single event. More often than not, separate small problems compound to create a larger problem.Divers and dive professionals interested in understanding first aid care for dive emergencies can now take the Diving Emergency Management Provider course from a DAN Instructor. This single program integrates the knowledge and skills from several DAN Training Programs into a single eight-hour day.

The Diving Emergency Management Provider course

includes:

 

           
         
           
       

Dan Dive Accident First Aid for Non-Divers

One of DAN Training's primary goals is to have oxygen and AEDs, and someone trained to use them, available at every dive site. This program makes it easier to train non-divers to provide that care in an emergency. This program is designed for nondivers and teaches them how to recognize the warning signs of decompression illness and help provide care for a diver involved in a dive emergency. More info >>

           
         
           
           

 

 

 

 

O2 Provider Adv O2 Provider First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life O2 Aquatics AED Aquatics DEMP Diver First Aid Non-Divers Email
 
 

© 2006 Seaclypse Dive Adventures, Inc.